Ruckman’s attempt to vindicate his name-calling with Scripture

He that hath no rule over his own spirit is like a city that is broken down, and without walls. (Prov. 25:28)

On numerous occasions Ruckman appeals to Scripture in an attempt to justify his outrageous name-calling. It cannot be denied that on a few occasions our Lord used some tough language when dealing with certain people, most notably the Pharisees. However, our Lord is sovereign, and was consistently capable of expressing anger without ever committing a sin and could see the heart of the person he was judging. This cannot be said of Dr. Ruckman or anyone else. Also, Christ in his omniscience knew whether or not a strong denunciation in a given situation would be counter-productive or not in the long run. There were a significant number of occasions when Christ turned away from a confrontation.

Ruckman also compares himself with such Bible characters as Jeremiah, Elijah, John the Baptist, and Paul in an attempt to justify his behavior. Ruckman seems to believe that the occasional tough language of Bible characters vindicate him, but it should be considered that we do not know the tone of voice used or to what extent the vocabulary used in a different language and culture thousands of years ago was as offensive or rude as it may sound to us in another language, time, and culture.

Proof of Ruckman’s lack of balance. Notice the phrase “the only proper way” in this quote:

“NAME CALLING” is the only proper way to preach when one is rebuking and warning. If you do not “call names,” it is not because you are loving, pious, circumspect, or “caring”; (Ruckman, Peter. Twenty-Two Years of the Bible Believers’ Bulletin Vol. 8 Essays on Bible Topics. 2010, p. 245)

Ruckman mocks those who believe in “what a sweet, kind, nice, wonderful person Jesus was.” (Ruckman’s Bible References: Personal Notes on Salient Verses in the Bible, p. 112). Instead, notice how he portrays Christ in the following terms that only a bitter unbeliever would be expected use:

Deceived apostates find it impossible to believe that the Lord Jesus would be sarcastic, vicious, vengeful, insulting, unkind, or deceptive. Like nuts in the nut house, they are optimistic all the time, and fashion a god after their own “powers of positive thinking.” “I the Lord have deceived that prophet” (Ezek. 14:9) (Ruckman’s Bible References: Personal Notes on Salient Verses in the Bible, p. 65)

Many other attempts at bringing Christ down closer to his level can be found throughout Ruckman’s writings. Notice these examples, and look up the passages to see for yourself if his portrayal of Christ is accurate:

It was Christ who cussed out his host at the dinner table (Luke 11:38-52). (Ruckman, Peter. Twenty-Two Years of the Bible Believers’ Bulletin Vol. 8 Essays on Bible Topics. 2010, p. 182)

Jesus Christ…ripped, blasted, scalded, steamed, “tore hide,” “peeled the bark,” shelled the corn,” and came out with the most vicious (Matt. 23:17), scathing (Mat. 12:34) sarcastic (Mat. 15:14), rude (Mat. 8:22) and offensive (Mat. 16:3) diatribes known to man. (Ruckman, Peter. Pastoral Epistles: The Bible Believer’s Commentary Series. Pensacola, FL: Bible Baptist Bookstore, 1989, p. 186)

In the last quote above, all the verses except one that Ruckman used to portray Christ as vicious, scathing, sarcastic and offensive were in passages in which Christ was speaking directly at the Pharisees. The only case in the above quote not directed at Pharisees was Mat. 8:22, where Christ merely stated “Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead.” As we have just demonstrated, nearly every time Ruckman gives a reference portraying Christ as rude and a name caller, it is when Christ was dealing directly with the scribes and Pharisees or similar unregenerate hypocritical religious leaders of his day.

See also Ruckman’s Twisted view of God.

Ruckman claims that “Paul was rude and crude in his preaching (see 1 Cor. 2:4).” (Ruckman’s Bible References: Personal Notes on Salient Verses in the Bible, p. 277) and yet the verse he furnished as proof says no such thing:

1 Cor. 2:4  And my speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power:

Ruckman has at times made reference to 2 Cor. 11:6 as if it vindicates him: “But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge; but we have been throughly made manifest among you in all things.” However, notice that the same Greek word translated as “rude” in 2 Cor. 11:6 was translated as “ignorant” in Acts 4:13. This fact and the context of 1 Cor. 2:4 indicate that “rude” does not mean what Ruckman wants it to mean.

That Ruckman is clearly unbalanced in his name calling is evident by this statement as follows:

“Name calling” is perfectly proper when identifying and describing anything or anybody (see Matt. 23, 2 Pet. 2, etc.). (Ruckman, Peter. Bible Believers’ Bulletin. Oct. 1997, p. 19)

Matt. 23 was directed only at scribes and Pharisees, and “Jerusalem” where their religious headquarters was. In both biblical passages it can be observed that the “name calling” was not directed at singular individuals, but rather to people groups.

We do not deny that in certain situations some limited forms of strong verbal denunciations are proper, even in public settings, as well as signaling out individuals (just as we are doing here at Ruckmanism.org). But it should be kept in mind that the Bible contains many warnings against the abuse of language:

If any man teach otherwise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to the doctrine which is according to godliness; He is proud, knowing nothing, but doting about questions and strifes of words, whereof cometh envy, strife, railings, evil surmisings, Perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth, supposing that gain is godliness: from such withdraw thyself. (1 Tim. 6:3-5)

A fool’s lips enter into contention, and his mouth calleth for strokes. (Pro. 18:6)

By this, men will know that you are my disciples, that you love one another. (Jn. 13:35)

For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. But if ye bite and devour one another, take heed that ye be not consumed one of another. This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh. ( Gal 5:14-16)

To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men. (Tit. 3:2)

Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers. ( Eph 4:29)

And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient, In meekness instructing those that oppose themselves; if God peradventure will give them repentance to the acknowledging of the truth; (2 Tim. 2:24-25)

3 Responses to “Ruckman’s attempt to vindicate his name-calling with Scripture”

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  1. Ahmed says:

    Even if Jesus was “rude”, does it occur to Ruckman (and others who use Jesus’ righteous behavior to defend their own sin) that they are not Jesus? Since they can rebuke people like Jesus, can they be crucified and rise from the dead like Jesus? I’m guessing no.

  2. Don says:

    It should be noteworthy that Jesus Christ and the apostles only spoke rudely on occasion, special occasions, not in every sermon preached or in every book written during the entire course of their lives. Pete Ruckman is clearly out of balance by making a ministry out of being, “God’s Junkyard Dog,” as he proclaims himself to be! I didn’t even know God had a junkyard, much less a junkyard dog!

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